ATTITUDES AND DISABILITY


MANY CONSIDER DISABILITY AS THE ATTITUDES AND ENVIRONMENTAL BARRIERS

THAT RESULT IN DISABILITY, NOT THE IMPAIRMENT ITSELF.

CHECK YOUR ATTITUDE HERE!


Person First Language

Presume Competence

The presence of a diagnosis often leads to a dismissal of potential and abilities that may be attained by an individual.  Relying on a the lens of disability unfairly limits the person to a box of inability.  When a person is assumed competent, it opens up the world for their experiences of ability for further learning, self-development and participation in the world.  Presuming competence is a framework for acknowledgement, for acceptance, for respect and for inclusion for the individual.

The following article, written by Kathie Snow of Disability is Natural, provides more information on this topic:

Our words, and the meaning we attach to those words, create attitudes and drive social policies and laws, influence our feelings and decisions, affect people's daily lives and more.  Words, their meanings, and how we use words matter a great deal! People with disabilities are people first. They are people with unique personalities and preferences who happen to have a need, a diagnosis or label.  Using language that reflects that disability is only one part of who a person is, really matters.

The following two articles, written by Kathie Snow of Disability is Natural, provide more information on this topic:


Dignity and Respect

Equality of Access

 

People with disabilities have a valued place among a network of people and a valued role in community life.  When people with disabilities are recognized as individuals and for their strengths and interests, versus their disabilities, they experience the same dignity and respect afforded those without disabilities.  Dignity and respect counter the marginalization that people with disabilities have historically experienced.

People with disabilities have the ability to access and benefit from all social, political and economic systems and entities, and including not only physical access, but also access to the same tools, services, organizations and facilities for which all people pay.  Equality of access levels the playing field for people with disabilities to share the social responsibilities and opportunities with all members of society.


Self Direction

Community Options

People with disabilities have opportunities for personal relationships and for meaningful involvement in the community in positive and creative ways of their own choosing.  Community options counters the historical segregation of people with disabilities.  Having full and direct access to all public places leads to full community presence and participation, which is true inclusion.  People with disabilities experience more meaningful lives with options within the community.

People with disabilities have opportunities for personal relationships and for meaningful involvement in the community in positive and creative ways of their own choosing.  Community options counters the historical segregation of people with disabilities.  Having full and direct access to all public places leads to full community presence and participation, which is true inclusion.  People with disabilities experience more meaningful lives with options within the community.


Representation

Self Direction 

People with disabilities reject the idea that representation of their needs or desires should occur without the full and direct participation of members of the group(s) affected by the policy.  People with disabilities or their representatives desire to be and can be leaders and decision makers, particularly in the development and reform of relevant services. When people with disabilities have the opportunity collaborative with systems to set agendas that affect them, the outcome is better.

People with disabilities and/or their representatives are capable of making or influencing the decisions and choices that affect the course of their lives.  Self-direction promotes personal choice and control over services, including who provides the services and how services are provided. People with disabilities  experience more meaningful lives through the information and choices provided through who self-direction.